Guest Blog ~ crowd force

Guest Blog ~ crowd force

October is National Breast Cancer Awareness Month.

Ben Brooks-Dutton from Life as a Widower has been recently been editing a crowd-sourced book with The Estée Lauder Companies UK, which asks, ‘What happens after breast cancer?’

Both my family and my husband’s family have been significantly affected by breast cancer.

After Leah was diagnosed, she was told that if she survived the blood cancer for which she was being treated, she would have a significantly higher risk of developing breast cancer. The consultant warned her sternly to be very vigilant about breast self-examination.

I remember feeling physically ill as the doctor spoke these words to my fifteen year old daughter.

Life as a Widower

A girl I know lost a close friend very suddenly over the summer. Her and I bumped into each other over the weekend and I asked her how she was doing. On first impressions, you would think she was really well; she was tanned, smiling and warm in her conversation. She sent me a message through Facebook the next day, though. She explained that she had been feeling very low recently and that she felt she had been hiding away from the world.

“I guess I felt the pressure that I should be coming to terms with it by now,” she explained, even though her friend only died three months ago.

I understood the pressure she spoke of immediately, because I felt it when my wife died, too. From this experience, I now believe that many of clichés that follow a close bereavement only really serve to make a…

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Guest Post – crashing waves

Guest Post – crashing waves

The words used in this blog post to describe grief are so beautiful and so true, I just had to reblog it……

Life as a Widower

A friend emailed me this morning after reading something he thought I might like to see.

‘Now in my defence,’ he began, ‘I never send you stuff like this, but I stumbled on it this morning and thought of you.’

I appreciated his caution; some days I’m just not in the mood to think or talk about grief. But then once in a while I read something that I feel compelled to share, mainly because I think it might just help someone else. I know from experience that a few words written in the right order and delivered at the right time can make all the difference. I for one have many people to thank for the words and time they have shared with me.

This following piece is guest post of sorts. Four years ago a young man, whom I know nothing about, took to the internet to try to find…

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